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The Weekly Newspaper of El Segundo Herald Publications - El Segundo, Torrance, Manhattan Beach, Hawthorne, Lawndale, & Inglewood Community Newspapers Since 1911 - (310) 322-1830 - Vol. 105, No. 10 - March 3, 2016 Inside This Issue Certified & Licensed Professionals.....................14 Classifieds............................4 Crossword/Sudoku.............4 Film Review..........................4 Legals............................ 12,13 Real Estate.....................7-11 School Spotlight..................2 Sports....................................5 Weekend Forecast El Segundo AYSO U10 All-Stars Finish in Third Place El Segundo AYSO U10 All-Stars won 3rd Place at Sectional Tournament by beating rival Arcadia, 4-1. Picture left to right: Coach Ron Heredia, Dominik Kopecky, Conrad Herring, Matheo Heredia, Gavin McKinnon, Michael Severson, Juddson Lister, Benji Kerin, H. Daniel Gomez, Jacob Delfino, James Baldino, Coach Geoff Lister. Photo by Hector Gomez. • Council Tweaks Richmond Street Project, Revisits Residential Building Code By Brian Simon Plans to begin the reconstruction of the 100-300 blocks of Richmond Street remain on track for mid-April, but a few features may no longer be part of the picture. On Tuesday night, the El Segundo City Council voted to remove some components because the price tag for the overall project exceeded the initial budget by 957,000. By a 3-2 vote (with Dave Atkinson and Mike Dugan dissenting), the Council approved staff’s recommendation to award the construction contract to lowest bidder Sully-Miller for $1,335,335. An additional $51,920 to maintain daily inspection services plus $112,745 to cover contingencies puts the Richmond job at $1.5 million—this compared to only $735,000 allocated by the Council. The main reason for the large uptick is that the scope of the project broadened to include providing more parking on the street. To cover the shortfall, the City will use $244,000 from the Downtown Parking In- Lieu fund, pull $350,000 from the finance software budget (since those monies won’t be needed for at least five years) and $29,000 from the general fund (expected to be replenished from the contingency monies) for a total of $623,000. The Council opted not to pull any monies from the first $500,000 payment coming this month from Raytheon for the latter’s South Campus development agreement. The remaining $334,000 will come from eliminating structured soil (saving 135,000, with the argument that the new trees won’t have invasive roots anyway); concrete paver trim edge details (saving 50,000, with the contention that this is purely an aesthetic feature and not critical); pedestrian lighting fixtures, poles and foundation ($90,000); and pedestrian lighting conduit ($59,000). Eliminating the pedestrian fixtures means the City must plan for lighting through Southern California Edison. Also, overall lighting will be reduced. In nixing the conduit installation, the Council is banking on the idea that the approved solar lighting will be sufficient. Otherwise, it will cost much more in the future to pay for undergrounding of electrical wires should the Council eventually opt to replace solar with LED lights. In considering all the options, staff also recommended and the Council agreed not to eliminate three-phase staging (which would have saved $100,000). Project construction will still proceed one block at a time to minimize overall impacts on businesses and residents. While in favor of most of the moves, Atkinson was against the idea of eliminating the pedestrian light poles—arguing that people in town told him that the quaint, unique fixtures were the biggest appealing factor of the new street design. Dugan preferred to do the project the right way with all the features intact, but did not feel it was fiscally responsible to go beyond what the Council set in the budget. He suggested to just perform the work on the 100 and 200 blocks. Despite the majority vote, the item will come back to the Council after the April 12 municipal election when the City’s financial complexion could change depending on the result of the Measure B vote and the prospect of new tax revenues on the way. At that time, the group could decide to re-insert some or all of the items removed on Tuesday night. Public Works Director Stephanie Katsouleas provided a basic timeline for construction, with the 100 block going first on April 15 followed by the 200 block on May 15 and then the 300 block last. Rain delays may play a factor, but Katsouleas said the 200 block should not take a full month and the entire project could be completed by mid-June. Other plans for the Richmond Street project include removing all remaining Ficus trees and replacing those with alternating Strawberry and King Palm trees; reducing sidewalk widths from 10 to seven feet while maintaining ADA access; increasing roadway width from 40 to 40 feet to accommodate angled parking on the west side and parallel on the east; and maintaining two-way traffic throughout all three blocks. Also on Tuesday, Councilmember Marie Fellhauer brought forth an item (supported by her colleagues) instructing staff to provide a report on the impacts of the changes to the City’s single family residence zone (R- 1) ordinance adopted back in 2006. While stating she understood the need to address mansionization and have light issues mitigated, Fellhauer contended that the code “went too far” and pointed out that “government’s job isn’t to tell people what their homes should See City Council, page 12 Friday Cloudy 65˚/57˚ Saturday Mostly Cloudy 66˚/57˚ Sunday Showers/ Wind 63˚/52˚


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