Page 2

Herald_030316_FNL_lorez

Page 2 March 3, 2016 EL SEGUNDO HERALD School Spotlight Treating Pain Leads to New Goal in Life W O R K+D I N E @ CONTINENTAL PARK ALONG THE ROSECRANS CORRIDOR IN EL SEGUNDO/MANHATTAN BEACH • Amenity Rich Location • Convenient Access to Metro Rail System, 405 & 105 Freeways • 10 minutes to LAX • Professional Property Management on Site • It’s Not Just a Location; It’s a Lifestyle! OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE CONTINENTAL PARK A project of C O N T I N E N TA L D E V E L O P M E N T C O R P O R AT I O N 2041 Rosecrans Av e . , E l S e g u n d o , C A 9 0 2 4 5 www. c o n t i n e n t a l d e v e l o p m e n t . c o m For Leasing Information, call 310.640.1520 By Cristian Vasquez For 20 years Dr. Harold Kraft used his medical abilities in the operating room as an anesthesiologist; there he was able to treat pain patients with epidural steroids during a time when that was the only treatment available in the field. Eventually, Dr. Kraft would leave the East Coast to California in search of different opportunities and would discover the effectiveness laser treatment to help pain patients; it’s a concept he now wants to push farther by funding a clinical trial that would focus on the efficiency of laser treatment on people with posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]. Dr. Kraft was a skeptic at first with regards to using lasers to treat pain patients. However, an old patient of his shared her personal success with laser treatment and the doctor looked further into the technology. “The results that she got were jaw dropping. After studying the biology of lasers, I believe that it is by far the best thing for treating skeletal and muscular pain,” Dr. Kraft said. “The results have been fantastic. I am seeing up to ninety percent of patients get some relief: the average relief is in the area of seventy percent. A seventy percent for pain relief is phenomenal.” Dr. Kraft opened his practice in August of 2015 in the City of Manhattan Beach, where he treats patients afflicted by different types of treat pains with lasers. He does not prescribe drugs or narcotics, nor does he use shots or needles, which he describes as exciting, given that conventional non-laser treatment has historically relied on these. “Most of my patients have failed trial drugs and other therapies, and this laser can make them better,” Dr. Kraft said. “There is almost nothing as satisfying as taking a patient that is in severe pain and taking them out of pain without a drug. It has been very exciting. You are able to treat a lot more pain than we were able to treat before.” However, Dr. Kraft came across a way to make his work in the field of pain relief not only more exciting but significantly more beneficial to the public, as a whole, while treating a local Vietnam War Veteran, who suffered from PTSD. “He introduced me to the fact that PTSD was a bad disease, which had negatively affected his life, so I started researching it,” Dr. Kraft said. “Within a month of when I started the research, a paper come out of Denver of a chiropractor and a psychiatrist using a laser similar to mine right into the head. Trans-cranial Laser to treat PTSD and TBI [traumatic brain injury].” Dr. Kraft describes the results published as breathtaking and phenomenal. Despite only being a 10-patient study, the results surpassed the average effectiveness of PTSD treatment, which is only helpful in 50 percent of patients. That 50 percent standard is considered the gold standard, but the new study gave Dr. Kraft hope that with laser treatment a higher standard could be met. “That was another fortuitous circumstance that made me realize that PTSD is a horrible disease and that I may have, via the Denver group, discovered what could be a breakthrough treatment, which is laser to the head,” Dr. Kraft said. “Only recently, in the past two years, the neurobiology completely supports that using lasers in the front of the head would treat PTSD.” Laser treatment is applied through a massage-like roller ball with the laser coming out of a quartz marble. The laser feels warm on the patient as it penetrates to the muscle or nerve or bone, it is absorbed by the mitochondria, which activates ATP [adenosine triphosphate]. The ATP energizes the cell and additional chemicals are created which accelerate healing and decrease pain. “Every cell in our body uses ATP; it is essentially a carrier of energy,” Dr. Kraft explained. “Every cell in our body uses ATP to carry energy from mitochondria to other parts of the body that need it. So the laser accelerates the body’s process for treating pain and for healing.” Using the pain-treatment laser technology on the brain, the Denver study revealed that applying the laser to the front of the head can help the prefrontal cortex grow back to its normal size. The amygdala, which is where emotions such as fear are generated, is constantly hyperactive in PTSD patients. The prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for a person’s ability to act rationally, process information and control the emptions produced by the amygdala, is physically shrunken in people afflicted with PTSD. “The timing was great and by happenstance A Musical Heart at El Segundo High School By Cece Stewart, junior at ESHS A Musical Heart is a new club on the campus of El Segundo High School (ESHS) this year. Top Row:  Tom, Vada, Middle:  Anna, Bianca, Jessa, Vada, Botton:  Jessica, Allison, Irene, Kalysa, Christina Founded by sophomore Irene Lee, the club’s mission, Lee explains, is to “help younger musicians give back to the community through their musical talents.” Students enhance performance skills through performances at senior living centers, hospitals, and throughout the community. Lee said “A Musical Heart hopes to teach not just its members, but the receptors, the importance and power of music in a person’s life.” Irene Lee serves as President, and is joined in See Musical Heart, page 14 ESUSD Hosts ‘Most Likely to Succeed’ Parents, educators and community members are invited to attend a free film screening of the award-winning documentary “Most Likely to Succeed” at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 10. The 89-minute film will be followed by a panel discussion by El Segundo Unified School District educators, and moderated by Superintendent Melissa Moore, about the future of education and why change is necessary. The presentation will take place at the El Segundo High School Performing Arts Center, located at 640 Main Street, El Segundo, CA 90245. “Most Likely to Succeed” examines the history of education, revealing the growing conversation around how schools and learning should happen for our current students to best prepare them for their present and future success. The schools and students highlighted in the film will not only challenge assumptions but also inspire optimism and encourage us to explore what is possible in our schools and communities. This film has been named “among the best edu-documentaries ever produced” by Education Week, and called a “smart and engaging look at education in the 21st century” by The Hollywood Reporter. “We know parents residing in El Segundo are highly engaged in their children’s education, which is why we are pleased to bring this film to our community,” said Melissa Moore, El Segundo Unified School District superintendent. “I encourage every parent to attend this film screening. The documentary is an excellent vehicle for parents to gain insight into the educational environment required to support 21st century learners. It does a fantastic job of highlighting the power of inquiry- and projectbased learning while also raising necessary questions and addressing inevitable anxieties.” Written and produced by Greg Whiteley, “Most Likely to Succeed” was featured at several international film festivals in 2015. More infor- mation on “Most Likely To Succeed” is available from the film’s website at http://mltsfilm.org.• See Dr. Harold Kraft, page 14


Herald_030316_FNL_lorez
To see the actual publication please follow the link above